Although it is useful to have studied Religious Studies at GCSE level, it is not a requirement of the course. The A level Religious Studies course covers the study of theology, philosophy, and ethics.

The A level covers philosophy and ethics seeking to explore ultimate questions such as is there life after death, does God exist and how we do we know right from wrong? The component on Christianity is looking at how Christians respond to issues of faith and morality in the modern world, for example how the religion has responded to the challenges of scientific discoveries about the creation of the world. Students will be challenged and inspired, whilst developing valuable skills sought after by higher education and employers.
Component 1: Philosophy of Religion and Ethics 50%

Section A: Philosophy of religion In this component, students will study and analyse arguments for God’s existence including life after death and miracles.

Section B: Ethics and religion Students will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of ethical theories and apply these to modern issues such as animal rights and cloning.

How it's assessed:

Written exam: 3 hours 50% of A level
Section A: Philosophy of religion – two compulsory two-part questions, each worth 10 marks and 15 marks.
Section B: Ethics and religion – two compulsory two-part questions, each worth 10 marks and 15 marks.

Component 2: Study of Religion and Dialogues 50%

Students will develop a knowledge and critical understanding of Christianity in the modern world, including the faiths beliefs about the Bible, response to secularisation and teachings on equal rights. The components also requires the completion of a synoptic study where students will evaluate the impact and influence Christianity has had on the ethical and philosophical issues studied in component one.

How it's assessed:

Written exam: 3 hours
Section A: Study of religion – two compulsory two-part questions, each worth 10 marks and 15 marks
Section B: The dialogue between philosophy of religion and religion – one unstructured synoptic question from a choice of two (25 marks).
Section C: The dialogue between ethical studies and religion – one unstructured synoptic question from a choice of two (25 marks).
A variety of teaching techniques are used to engage and impart vital knowledge for the course including group work, debating key ideas, presentations, independent study, and research-based tasks.
Religious studies leads on to many varied career paths these include aspects of the law such as a solicitor or a police officer. It is also a valued subject for those going into jobs where they are helping and supporting others such as social work, counsellor, charity fundraising and teaching.